Disability Support Services

Your path to equal access

What is Disability Support Services?

Welcome to Disability Support Services (DSS), where we provide reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities that impact their education. We are dedicated to ensuring equal access and inclusion for all students with either temporary or permanent physical, health, learning, sensory, or psychological disabilities. Accommodations may include adaptive equipment, technology, testing, classroom tools, information and referrals.

If you feel like you have a disability or struggle in class or on campus but have not been diagnosed, stop in and visit us to see how we can help.

 

 

How do I get started?

  • Call or stop by our office to make an intake appointment with one of our specialists.
  • Bring supporting documentation of your disability to your appointment. If your disability is not yet documented, please speak with our specialists, who can give you a referral to receive documentation.
  • Complete your intake file.
Resource Center students

 

Documentation Guidelines

Disability Support Services cannot authorize any accommodation unless it is supported by appropriate documentation. The documentation helps to establish that the student can be considered a person with a disability, the impact of the disability, and determine which reasonable accommodations are appropriate for the student. In accordance with state and federal laws, accommodations must be determined on a case-by-case basis supported with documentation from a qualified practitioner who is properly licensed and/or credentialed to diagnose and treat the condition within the scope of their practice.

You need a written statement from a qualified practitioner including:

  1. A diagnosis of the disability/health condition.
  2. Statement of clearly defined current functional limitations related to the disability/health condition with specific focus on barriers to the educational and/or housing environment.
  3. Statement of prognosis: permanent or temporary. If temporary, information on the expected duration of the disability/health condition and timeline for re-evaluation.
  4. Information regarding medications prescribed and the side effects of those medications (if needed for identification of appropriate accommodations).
  5. All documentation must be on the diagnostician’s letterhead, and signed and dated by a clearly identified diagnostician on the report. Reports should include credentials and contact information for the individual providing the diagnosis.

You need a written statement from a qualified practitioner including:

  1. Audiology report.
  2. Statement of the extent of hearing loss, and prescribed adaptive equipment (e.g. hearing aids, FM system, etc.).
  3. Statement of clearly defined current functional limitations related to the disability/health condition with specific focus on barriers to the educational and/or housing environment.
  4. Audiology report must include the diagnosing practitioner’s interpretation of the results.
  5. All documentation must be on the diagnostician’s letterhead, and signed and dated by a clearly identified diagnostician on the report. Reports should include credentials and contact information for the individual providing the diagnosis.

You need a written statement from a qualified practitioner including:

  1. Ophthalmologic or optometric report.
  2. Statement of the extent of vision loss, and prescribed adaptive equipment (e.g. JAWS, other screen reader, etc.).
  3. Statement of clearly defined current functional limitations related to the disability/health condition with specific focus on barriers to the educational and/or housing environment.
  4. Ophthalmologic or optometric report must include the diagnosing practitioner’s interpretation of the results.
  5. All documentation must be on the diagnostician’s letterhead, and signed and dated by a clearly identified diagnostician on the report. Reports should include credentials and contact information for the individual providing the diagnosis.

You need copies of public school diagnostic testing records or the results of psycho-educational tests administered by a qualified practitioner (psychologist or educational diagnostician). Documentation should have been performed at the adult level.

A single test and/or an informal screening instrument (such as Slingerland) is not acceptable for the purpose of diagnosis.

Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and/or 504 plans, are not sufficient for the purpose of documentation, unless they include the following information:

  1. One instrument which measures aptitude (such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised).
  2. One instrument which measures achievement (such as the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-educational Battery-
    Revised).
  3. DSM diagnostic classification.
  4. Clear evidence of the diagnosis.
  5. A written interpretation of the test results, including the academic areas affected, and functional limitations
    focused on barriers to the educational environment.
  6. Reports should include credentials and contact information for the individual providing the diagnosis.

You documentation should have been performed at the adult level. You need a written statement from a qualified practitioner including:

  1. A diagnosis of ADHD, identifies the ADHD subtype (e.g., inattentive, hyperactive, combined).
  2. DSM diagnostic classification.
  3. A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the diagnosis, including
    evaluation results and standardized scores.
  4. A written interpretation of the test results, including the academic areas affected, and functional limitations
    focused on barriers to the educational environment.
  5. Medications prescribed, as well as side effects of those medications (if needed for identification of appropriate
    accommodations).
  6. All documentation must be on the diagnostician’s letterhead, and signed and dated by a clearly identified
    diagnostician on the report. Reports should include credentials and contact information for the individual
    providing the diagnosis.

You need a written statement from a qualified practitioner including:

  1. DSM diagnostic, diagnosis of the psychological condition.
  2. A written interpretation of the test results used to make the diagnosis.
  3. Statement of clearly defined current functional limitations related to the disability/health condition with specific
    focus on barriers to the educational and/or housing environment.
  4. Medications prescribed, as well as side effects of those medications (if needed for identification of appropriate
    accommodations).
  5. All documentation must be on the diagnostician’s letterhead, and signed and dated by a clearly identified
    diagnostician on the report. Reports should include credentials and contact information for the individual
    providing the diagnosis.

 

Student testing


 Assistive Technology

The Assistive Technology Center (ATC) provides a wide range of assistive technology services to ensure all students have equal access to education. Assistive technology is any piece of either hardware or software used to increase, maintain or improve the functional capabilities of an individual with a disability. Our services include accessible course materials, classroom course content and test-related accommodations. Our services inspire students to apply a variety of strategies to enhance their learning experience.

We work collaboratively within Disability Support Services and with instructors to promote a Universal Design for Learning. Our team operates within the spirit of Section 508, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Web Content Accessiblity Guidelines 2.0.

 

Services offered:

  • Braile, tactile and image enhancers
  • Text-to-speech (screen readers)
  • Speech-to-text (voice recognition)
  • Electronic materials
  • Electronic interpreting services
  • Set-up and training
  • Equipment loans
Student using assistive technology

 


 

“Disability Support Services is awesome. They are always helpful and courteous to both faculty and students. The team is there not only to help students achieve, but also to facilitate faculty in equitably assessing student progress.”

Cara Anderson, Assistant Professor for Business

 

Are you experiencing learning challenges? Do you study, but don't get the grades you want? Do you have trouble understanding what you read? Is there a subject that seems harder than it should? Is it difficult to pay attention in class?

Disability Support Services might be able to help you get the answers you need! Come in or call us for an appointment today. We may be able to refer you for a formal evaluation at no cost to you!

Privacy is our priority, however, faculty and staff may be informed of your need for reasonable accommodations once you qualify for services. Information regarding a student's disability is considered confidential and will not be released without written permission.

 

FAST FACTS Disabilty Support Services

1 in 4

People live with a disability in the United States

800+

Students accommodated since fall 2016

100%

Disability Support Services serves students in every program

1

Accommodations are individualized for each student

contact

Students walking around CBC's Pasco campus