Campus Security & Safety

Committed to providing a safe and welcoming learning environment

We're here to help!

CBC Security is committed to providing our campus with a safe and welcoming learning environment for all. We are dedicated to protecting our students 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 365 days a year.

In case of emergency, dial 911.

Pasco Security

509-542-4819
On campus Ext: 7777

Richland Security

509-539-8167
On campus Ext: 4021

 

Sign up for emergency notifications!

CBC's Emergency Notification System (ENS) sends text messages and/or emails in the case of incidents such as a campus lockdown or evacuation or if the campus is closed due to inclement weather. All student email addresses (name@students.columbiabasin.edu) are auto-subscribed, but accounts require renewal every two years. We encourage you to also sign up for notifications on your cell phone and/or personal email. Community members are also invited to register.

 

Safety services provided by CBC Security

  • Need someone to walk you to your car?

    Whether it's after dark or you just feel uneasy, we can accompany you from campus buildings to your vehicle.

  • Need a jump?

    If your car battery is dead, we are happy to provide vehicle battery jumps.

  • Locked out?

    Whether you've accidentally locked your keys inside your car or lost them, we provide vehicle door unlocking.

  • Got in a wreck?

    We are happy to assist with preliminary investigations of vehicular collision or auto vandalism reports.

  • Lose something?

    Visit us in the V Building to see if your lost item has been turned in. If you have found an item, please report it to Campus Security.

See Something, Say Something

Methods for reporting crimes or suspicious behaviors

Campus Security is a shared responsibility of the entire campus community. If you have seen or heard of incidents or behaviors that affect the safety and security of CBC, ASaferCBC provides a secure way to report issues. You have the choice to remain anonymous or to reveal your identity. Alternatively, you may feel more comfortable with reporting crimes to athletic team coaches, your instructor or student organization advisors. If you are a victim of a crime that occurs on our campus, observe criminal activity or if someone reports a crime to you, contact CBC Security, report it through ASaferCBC or tell a trusted CBC employee.

We want to be sure that all safety issues are addressed to ensure a safe campus environment for our students, employees and guests.

Inclement Weather FAQ

We will communicate weather-related closure or delay decisions in variety of ways, including:

  • Alerts via our Emergency Notification System (ENS)
  • Alert banner at the top of the CBC website
  • Social media posts on CBC’s Facebook Page
  • Automated messages on the CBC main phone line (509-547-0511)
  • Emails to your college-provided student email address

However, if inclement weather impacts essential services (e.g., electricity, internet, cell service), announcements may be limited to the communication tools available – if any.

All student email addresses (name@students.columbiabasin.edu) are auto-subscribed, but accounts require renewal every two years. We encourage you to also sign up for notifications on your cell phone and/or personal email. Community members are also invited to register.

No, we will not. No notification means no cancellation or delay. However, please remember that conditions may change rapidly, so an announcement to close a campus, delay the start time of classes or early release/closure may be made at any time.

We do not send notifications if the campus is open. No notification means no cancellation or delayed start. Please avoid calling campus phone extensions to ask staff about a possible campus closure or delay.

CBC administrators, safety and facilities staff assess current and developing weather conditions at CBC campuses and the surrounding areas in making weather closure or delay decisions. We also collaborate with school districts, Washington State University Tri-Cities and public safety officials with the cities and counties.

Closures, delayed starts or early releases may be announced at any time due to changing weather conditions. However, we make every effort to announce morning closures by 5:15 am and evening class cancellations by 3:30 pm.

CBC rarely makes an announcement the night before because our crews work overnight to prepare the campus parking lots and sidewalks. City and county plows are also at work overnight, so the conditions of roads at 9 pm may improve by the early morning hours.

We have the College community’s safety and best interests at the center of all decisions. While the timing of announcements will not always be ideal for everyone, we encourage students to use caution and assess your local situations to determine if you feel comfortable traveling to campus. We understand that everyone does not live close to CBC, so always assess weather conditions in your local area before determining whether you feel it is safe to travel. If you are unsure if it is prudent to travel, please use your personal judgment and make the best decision for yourself regarding coming to school. Students who are not comfortable commuting are asked to notify their instructors via Canvas that they will not be in class due to travel concerns. Ultimately, it is up to each faculty member to determine how they will handle these types of absences.

We encourage students and faculty to use Canvas to communicate with each other during periods of inclement weather.

When we announce a delayed start, faculty also have the discretion to cancel classes on an individual basis for weather-related travel concerns and will inform students about a cancellation directly via Canvas at least 90 minutes before the class start time.

We encourage students and faculty to use Canvas to communicate with each other during periods of inclement weather.

Students are asked to use their personal judgement to determine whether or not they are comfortable traveling to campus. If you are not comfortable commuting and are unable to attend classes, students are asked to notify their instructors via Canvas that they will not be in class due to travel concerns. Ultimately, it is up to each faculty member to determine how they will handle these types of absences.

We encourage students and faculty to use Canvas to communicate with each other during periods of inclement weather.

Some faculty members may attempt to set a makeup session when students are available or use other means to complete the missed assignments. This decision is at the discretion of the faculty member.

We encourage students and faculty to use Canvas to communicate with each other during periods of inclement weather.

Yes. If the campus is closed, all activities and events are cancelled, and the campus is closed to all students, the public and non-essential personnel.

Please be cautious and take extra time to arrive on campus and while walking on campus. Please wear appropriate footwear to help avoid a slip or fall.

Our grounds, custodial and maintenance teams arrive early during snowy or icy conditions to prepare campus walkways and work throughout the day to maintain sidewalks and parking lots. However, depending on changing conditions, not all areas of campus may be cleared at all times.

Emergency Response Procedures

The basic emergency procedures outlined here are designed to inform and prepare you in the event of an emergency.

Active shooter situations are dynamic and evolve rapidly, demanding immediate deployment of law enforcement resources to stop the shooting and mitigate harm to innocent victims. Past experience shows us that these situations are usually over very quickly, and you need to be prepared to protect yourself before law enforcement can get there. In general, how you respond to an armed intruder/active shooter will be dictated by the specific circumstances of the encounter, bearing in mind there could be more than one shooter involved in the same situation. If you find yourself involved in an armed intruder/active shooter situation, try to remain calm and focused. The following information will aid you in deciding which course of action might be the best option depending on your situation. Use these strategies to help form a plan for survival.

If you hear what sounds like gunshots or popping, immediately assume they are gunshots and don’t investigate; quickly decide one of three courses of action:

  1. Can you stay where you are and secure yourself from the shooter?
    If so, take action to secure your position, and if it is safe, immediately call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone). Shelter in place.
  2. Can you escape the building or get to an area where you are secure from the shooter (or at least some place where the shooter can't see you)?
    Get to a secure area if possible, and immediately call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone). Shelter in place. If outside, run away from the gunshots or armed intruder.
  3. Are you unable to escape from the shooter?
    If you can't escape, you need to assess the situation to see if you can shield yourself, or if you need to prepare to take aggressive action to protect yourself.

As a last resort:
You may need to physically confront an armed intruder.

To further prepare, the Department of Homeland Security and FEMA's Ready.gov have instructive Active Shooter videos to improve public awareness, safety and response.

No matter where you are on campus, if you are instructed to shelter in place, the basic steps will generally remain the same:

  • If possible, proceed to a room that can be locked.
  • Close and lock all windows and doors, and turn off all of the lights.
  • If the room cannot be locked, barricade the door with heavy furniture such as desks, tables and bookcases, or whatever is available.
  • Attempt to get everyone down on the floor and ensure that no one is visible from outside the room, cover windows if possible.
  • Stay quiet and silence radios, cell phones and other audio devices.
  • One person in the room should call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone); advise the dispatcher of what is taking place and inform him/her of your location.
  • Remain in place until police or a campus administrator known to you gives the "all clear." Do not trust unfamiliar voices, and do not respond to any voice commands until you can verify with certainty that they are being issued by a police officer or known campus authority.

If the fire is small and extinguishable:

  • Extinguish the fire using a fire extinguisher, if possible.
  • Never put yourself in harms way - evacuate the room where the fire is located to maintain your safety.
  • Confine the fire by shutting the room door.
  • Notify CBC Security at ext. 7777 from campus phones, 509-542-4777 from cell phones.

If the fire is large, very smoky or rapidly spreading:

  • Immediately sound the building fire alarm and evacuate the building.
  • Call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone).
  • Notify CBC Security at ext. 7777 from campus phones, 509-542-4777 from cell phones.
  • Inform others in the building, who may not have responded to the alarm, to evacuate immediately.
  • Walk, do not run, to the nearest exit.
  • Assure that persons with disabilities are assisted in evacuations.
  • Secure entrances and warn others who may try to enter the building after the alarm stops.
  • Do not use an elevator, which may become inoperative.

What to do if you receive a bomb threat telephone call:

  1. Be calm.
  2. Be courteous.
  3. Listen. Do not interrupt the caller.
  4. Write the message as precise as possible.
  5. Note date, time of call.
  6. If possible, ask the following questions.
    • When will the bomb go off?
    • Where is it located?
    • What kind is it?
    • Why was it placed?
    • How do you know so much about it?
    • Who put it there?
    • Where are you calling from?
    • What is your name, phone number and address?
  7. After the caller hangs up, immediately call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone), then notify CBC Security at ext. 7777 from campus phones, 509-542-4777 from cell phones.

Sexual Offender Notification

Columbia Basin College will provide timely and appropriate notification of the presence of a convicted sexual offender. Information regarding sexual offenders will be displayed in accordance with RCW 4.24.550. The extent of public disclosure of relevant and necessary information shall be directly related to the level of risk posed by the offender to the community and needs of the affected community members for information to enhance their individual and collective safety.

Police departments have no legal authority to direct where sex offenders may live. Unless court ordered restrictions exist, the offender is constitutionally free to live wherever they choose. Abuse by citizens of this information to threaten, intimidate, or harass registered sex offenders will not be tolerated. Such abuse could end our ability to do community notifications. Additional information can be found in the Sexual Offender Notification policy.

 

The Clery Act

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (the “Clery Act”) requires that a number of non-security campus affiliated individuals report crime statistics to campus security each year. The information is used for the College’s Annual Security and Fire Report published each October 1. The Clery Act requires that four general categories of crimes be included in the annual reporting of crime statistics: criminal offenses, hate crimes, VAWA offenses and arrests and referrals for disciplinary action.

The Timely Warning Notifications Policy, which complies with the Clery Act, covers the procedures the College will follow in the event of a serious and ongoing threat to the College community. The College will issue a Timely Warning Notification for all Clery Act crimes, as defined by the Timely Warning Policy, but the College may issue Timely Warning Notifications for other incidents that pose a serious or ongoing threat to the College community.

The Emergency Notifications Policy, which complies with the Clery Act, covers the procedures the College will follow in the event of an emergency situation and outlines the methods of communicating an emergency to the College community or appropriate segments of the College community.

Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA)

The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989 - also known as the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act - requires institutions of higher education to establish policies that address unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol and illicit drugs for faculty, staff and students. Columbia Basin College (“CBC” or “the College”) faculty, staff and students are also subject to federal and Washington state laws.

The DFSCA requires the establishment of a drug and alcohol prevention program, which includes the notification below. All members of the CBC Community are encouraged to review the notification and information on the linked pages. This information is also distributed on an annual basis to faculty, staff and students via mass email to CBC-assigned email accounts.

DFSCA Annual Required Written Distribution Information to Students 

The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act requires that each institution distribute the following in writing to all students annually:

  • Student Code of Conduct that clearly prohibit, at a minimum, the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol on school property or as part of any school activities;

  • A description of the applicable legal sanctions under federal, state, or local law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol;

  • A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol;

  • A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, and re-entry programs that are available to students as resources;

  • A clear statement that the institution will impose disciplinary sanctions on students (consistent with federal, state, or local law), and a description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion and referral for prosecution, for violations of the Student Code of Conduct.

 

Washington State Drug Laws (Chapter 69.50 RCW)

This information is provided for informational purposes and may not represent the current status of the law. The Washington State Legislature provides access to Washington laws.

The following is a partial list of illicit drugs considered to be controlled substances by the State of Washington:

  • Narcotics (opium and cocaine, and all drugs extracted, derived or synthesized from opium and cocaine, including crack cocaine and heroin);

  • Methamphetamine;

  • Barbiturates; and

  • Hallucinogenic Substances (LSD, peyote, mescaline, psilocybin, PCP).
State Penalties
  1. State Penalties for Illegal Sale of Controlled Substances:  The illegal sale of any controlled substance is punishable by up to five years in prison, $10,000 fine, or both.

  2. State Penalties for Illegal Manufacture or Delivery of Controlled Substances: Schedule I or II Narcotics or flunitrazepam - Up to 10 years in prison, $25,000 to $100,000 fine, or both. Any other controlled substances under Schedule I, II, III, IV or V, except flunitrazepam - Up to five years in prison, $10,000 fine, or both.

  3. State Penalties for Possession of Controlled Substances: Possession of any controlled substance is punishable by up to five years in prison, a $10,000 fine, or both.

More severe penalties are provided for persons convicted of providing controlled substances to minors, to repeat offenses and to offenses on or near schools or parks.

Special Note Regarding Marijuana:  Marijuana remains illegal for minors (persons under 21 years of age) to possess, sell or use and is illegal to possess for a person of any age in amounts over 28.3 grams. Marijuana remains illegal under federal law and policies concerning marijuana at the College remain unchanged. It is illegal to produce, distribute or use marijuana on College property or during College-sponsored activities.

Washington State Alcohol Laws (Chapters 66.44 & 46.61 RCW)

This information is provided for informational purposes and may not represent the current status of the law. The Washington State Legislature provides access to Washington laws.

The following is a partial list of alcohol related laws and penalties.

Law(s) Title Prohibitions
RCW 46.61.502

Driving Under the Influence Prohibit operating motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or any drug.
RCW 46.61.504 Physical Control of Vehicle Under the Influence
RCW 46.61.5055 Alcohol & Drug Violators - Penalty schedule
RCW 46.61.517


Refusal of test - Admissibility of Evidence Refusal of person to take alcohol test or drug concentration in the person's blood or breath is admissible in a court of law.
RCW 46.20.308 Implied Consent - Test Refusal - Procedures
RCW 66.44.100 Opening or consuming liquor in public place - Penalty Prohibits opening or consuming liquor in a public place.
RCW 66.44.270 Furnishing liquor to minors-Possession, use - Penalties - Exhibition of effects - Exceptions Prohibits the sale or supply of liquor to a minor. It also prohibits anyone from permitting a minor to consume liquor on premises under that person's control and prohibits minors from possessing, consuming, or otherwise acquiring any liquor.
RCW 66.44.290 Minor purchasing or attempting to purchase liquor - Penalty Prohibits anyone under the age of 21 from purchasing or attempting to purchase alcohol.
RCW 66.44.310 Minors frequenting off-limits area-Misrepresentation of age - Penalty - Classification of licensees Prohibits using a false identification card or misrepresenting your age for the purpose of securing alcohol.
RCW 66.44.325 Unlawful transfer to minor of age identification Prohibits the use and manufacture of false ID cards.
RCW 66.44.370 Resisting or opposing officers in enforcement of title Prohibits anyone from resisting arrest by a law enforcement official for an alcohol related crime.
Federal Drug Laws

The possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs is prohibited by federal law. Strict penalties are provided for drug convictions, including mandatory prison terms for many offenses. The following information, although not complete, is an overview of federal penalties for first convictions. All penalties are doubled for any subsequent drug conviction.

A. Denial of Federal Benefits (21 USC §862)
A federal drug conviction may result in the loss of federal benefits, including school loans, grants, contracts and licenses. Federal drug trafficking convictions may result in denial of federal benefits for up to five years for a first conviction, 10 years for a second conviction and permanent denial of federal benefits for a third conviction. Federal drug convictions for possession may result in denial of federal benefits for up to one year for a first conviction and up to five years for subsequent convictions.

B. Forfeiture of Personal Property and Real Estate (21 USC §853)
Any person convicted of a federal drug offense punishable by more than one year in prison shall forfeit to the United States any personal or real property related to the violation, including houses, cars and other personal belongings. A warrant of seizure may be issued and property seized at the time an individual is arrested on charges that may result in forfeiture.

C. Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties (21 USC §841)
Penalties for federal drug trafficking convictions vary according to the quantity of the controlled substance involved in the transaction. The following list is a sample of the range and severity of federal penalties imposed for first convictions. Penalties for subsequent convictions are twice as severe. If death or serious bodily injury results from the use of a controlled substance that has been illegally distributed, the person convicted on federal charges of distributing the substance faces a prison term of not less than 20 years, but not more than life, and fines ranging up to $8 million. Persons convicted on federal charges of drug trafficking within 1,000 feet of a university (21 USC §860) face penalties of prison terms and fines which are twice as high as the regular penalties for the offense, with a mandatory prison sentence of at least one year.

D. Federal Drug Possession Penalties (21 USC §844)
Persons convicted on federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to one year in prison and a minimum fine of $1,000, or both. Second convictions are punishable by not less than 15 days but not more than two years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are punishable by not less than 90 days, but not more than three years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000. Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine impose a mandatory prison term of not less than five years but not more than 20 years and a minimum fine of $1,000, or both, if:

a. it is a first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams;
b. it is a second conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams;
c. it is a third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount exceeds 1 gram.

Civil penalties of up to $10,000 may also be imposed for possession of small amounts of controlled substances, whether or not criminal prosecution is pursued. Special sentencing provisions for possession of Flunitrazepam (Rohypnol, "roofies" or "roaches") impose a prison term of not more than 3 years, a fine up to $5,000, or both.

The following is a brief summary of information regarding the health risks associated with the use of alcohol and illicit drugs.

  • Alcohol
    • Dependence: High
    • Possible Effects: Impaired memory, slurred speech, drunken behavior, slow onset vitamin deficiency, organ damage
    • Effects of Overdose: Vomiting, respiratory depression, loss of consciousness, possible death
    • Withdrawal Syndrome: Trembling, anxiety, insomnia, vitamin deficiency, confusion, hallucinations, convulsions
  • Anabolic Steroids (e.g. testosterone)
    • Dependence: Unknown
    • Possible Effects: Virilization, edema, testicular atrophy, gynecomastia, acne, aggressive behavior
    • Effects of Overdose: Unknown
    • Withdrawal Syndrome: Possible depression
  • Cannabis (e.g. marijuana, hashish, hashish oil)
    • Dependence: Moderate
    • Possible Effects: Euphoria, relaxed inhibitions, increased appetite, disorientation
    • Effects of Overdose: Fatigue, paranoia, possible psychosis
    • Withdrawal Syndrome: Insomnia, hyperactivity, decreased appetite
  • Depressants (e.g. GHB, benzodiazepines)
    • Dependence: Moderate
    • Possible Effects: Slurred speech, disorientation, drunken behavior without odor of alcohol, impaired memory of events, interacts with alcohol
    • Effects of Overdose: Shallow respiration, clammy skin, dilated pupils, weak and rapid pulse, coma, possible death
    • Withdrawal Syndrome: Anxiety, insomnia, tremors, delirium, convulsions, possible death
  • Hallucinogens (e.g. LSD, PCP, ecstasy, mushrooms, peyote)
    • Dependence: Moderate - High
    • Possible Effects: Heightened senses, teeth grinding, dehydration, illusions and hallucinations, altered perception of time and distance
    • Effects of Overdose: Increased body temperature, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac arrest; unable to direct movement, feel pain, or remember
    • Withdrawal Syndrome: Muscle aches, drowsiness, depression, acne
  • Narcotics (e.g. heroin, morphine, codeine)
    • Dependence: High
    • Possible Effects: Euphoria, drowsiness, respiratory depression, constricted pupils, nausea
    • Effects of Overdose: Slow and shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, coma, possible death
    • Withdrawal Syndrome: Watery eyes, runny nose, yawning, loss of appetite, irritability, tremors, panic, cramps, nausea, chills and sweating
  • Stimulants (e.g. cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine)
    • Dependence: High
    • Possible Effects: Increased alertness, excitation, euphoria, increased pulse rate and blood pressure, insomnia, loss of appetite
    • Effects of Overdose: Agitation, increased body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions, possible death
    • Withdrawal Syndrome: Apathy, long periods of sleep, irritability, depression, disorientation

Adapted from U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration "Drugs of Abuse" and from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism "Alcohol's Effects on the Body".

Statement of Responsibility
All students at CBC are an important part of the campus community and must abide by the policies of the Student Code of Conduct. These policies prohibit the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol under local, state, and federal laws. Students will be held accountable for their behavior if found responsible for violating any standards of conduct per the policies in the Student Code of Conduct.

Jurisdiction of the College’s Discipline Process
The policies within the Student Code of Conduct will apply to student behavior that occurs on College property and at College-sponsored events and activities. These policies will also apply to violations of the conduct code that occur off campus, which includes alleged violations of local, state, and federal law. When a student is involved with an off-campus alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct, the Student Conduct Officer will determine whether the student will be subject to the discipline process outlined in the Student Code of Conduct. When a student is charged with a violation of federal, state, or local law, and college disciplinary action is also taken, campus proceedings may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings.

Each student is responsible for their conduct from the time of enrollment through their severance of a relationship with the College (e.g. the actual awarding of a degree or certificate). For more information regarding the jurisdiction of the College’s discipline process, please refer to the Student Code of Conduct link above.

Sanctions
CBC will impose disciplinary sanctions on students who are found responsible for violating the Alcohol and Drug policies of the College. A description of each sanction can be found in Article IV (link to Article IV) of the Student Code of Conduct, and can include referrals for prosecution and the completion of a rehabilitation program.

 

Even though students can be held accountable for their behaviors when violating the policies of the Student Rights and Responsibilities, CBC understands that the health and well-being of the students within the campus community can outweigh the concerns for the discipline process. If a student wishes to seek help for any alcohol or drug related substance abuse, they may contact the Counseling and Advising Center, in confidence, for resources and additional information regarding available and appropriate substance counseling, treatment or rehabilitation programs.

contact

Security staff